Full-Time Employee

Here you are!

I’m most likely in the same boat as you. I’m employed full-time. I used to be quite unhappy, but I’ve taken a lot more control over my circumstances, so I’m at the very least, content.

But I want to know what you’re struggling with. Is it career satisfaction, making enough to survive, dealing with bosses?

Let me know in the comments:

  1. What you do
  2. What’s your biggest career/job-related problem

 

8 thoughts on “Full-Time Employee”

  1. I have a degree in “strategic communication”. I graduated from university three years ago but wanted to fulfill my dream of living in Colorado. I LOVE where I live, but I am having trouble finding or rather.. staying satisfied in a job. Especially, in the small mountain town where I live — jobs are somewhat limited. I have been most recently working at a ski resort which has great perks, obviously. However, I’ve hopped around in departments and I just feel stuck.

    I am currently in an administrative role with the real estate company here. It’s very small and my boss treats me so well. However, I feel like I have to report directly to 5 bosses (the realtors) and I just also feel like a prisoner like the person who commented above. I don’t make a lot of money in exchange for the lifestyle, I suppose so it’s hard to save up to travel which I am dying to do.

    The job has just become quite repetitive and I find myself distracted everyday at work and thinking about what else I would like to do. I want something I can have interest and passion in doing. I’ve always loved working with/for animals, so maybe one day I can pursue something along those lines.

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  2. I have a Bachelor’s degree in English and am about to go for my Master’s in Liberal Studies. My current job is a Project Manager for an IT security firm, but neither the position nor the industry are anything that remotely ever interested me. I have been doing this for about 2 and a half years and started simply because I could not find any other job and needed to pay the bills.

    My biggest problem is that I do not like my job, nor the people I work with (including my useless boss), and I am not actually very good at it either. Every day I have enormous anxiety about the work that I have to get done. The issue is that I make more money than I have ever made before and have grown accustomed to living on this budget. If I were to quit tomorrow and start another job (that I would be qualified for and even remotely enjoy), I would probably bring in about 50% of my current income.

    I am starting my Master’s in Liberal Studies first, because I’ve always wanted a Master’s degree, second because it will allow me to teach at the college level, and third, because it’s kind of a make-your-own-degree degree and for someone like me who has never known what she wanted to do (except a little bit of writing and maybe teaching), it’s perfect. But I’m afraid to leave this job in pursuit of something I would enjoy more.

    I’m a big thinker and dreamer. I’m a writer and a reader. I’m a teacher. I’m an entrepreneur and a lover of rescuing all types of humans and animals. I don’t know how to have a job that I love but that also pays the bills. I feel that I will never win this battle.

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  3. I do not have a degree. I started college a couple of times but I never stuck with schooling. I have worked in a variety of situations from retail to manufacturing. I am currently in manufacturing where I am a wiring technician. It is not exciting, but it pays the bills. I have been in this job for almost 4 years, I think. At this point, I do not even remember the exact year I started the job.
    Over the last several years, work has become a chore that has now reached the level of insufferable. I hate it with a passion because I have no passion for what I do. There is no fulfillment. I turned 44 in February and all I can think about is how I cannot continue in the same vein for the next 30 years.
    I also detest the management. There is no compassion, no sensitivity- They are not helping me and I am not able to help anyone to expand themselves through this position. It feels like a soul crushing experience but I cannot seem to move forward in the direction I would like to go.

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  4. I’m a digital court reporter. I fell into it after 6 horrible months an assistant at a law office, thinking it was a journalist position (long story.) I thought I’d stick around for a year or two to get some job history behind me but it’s now been five years and I’m still stuck in it. It isn’t fulfilling in the least, I’m just dictating the words of others all day. I’m not sure where to go from here because I’ve had so much rejection in my quest for career change and don’t feel like this job has provided me with any skills I can use. It feels very hopeless.

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  5. Hi Mike,

    Love your personalisation. Thank you very much for doing this.

    I’m a full time IT coordinator in a non-IT company, looking after IT matters in all of our offices in Australia and New Zealand. As an INFP, I relate deeply to the struggle of staying organised, which I do enjoy but just can’t stay consistent with. And I happen to need this with a job that deals with such a large scope of work.

    I’m still new to this job – not even a whole year yet, so I’m not calling quits any time soon and I don’t hate it enough to do so just yet either. In 5 years or sooner, yes maybe. Although I don’t know what yet and I feel that there are more important things to figure out first now, which will probably lead me to the answer of that future anyway.

    Hope this is enough to explain my situation in the short time that I have. Thank you again for doing this.

    Cheers,
    Tina

    Reply
  6. Hi Mike!

    Recently graduated from a music college, I’m a full-time employee in a small appliance-installation company, and in the side I perform with a few bands and projects, doing session work on recordings here and there. I like the jobs that I have, but I’m also sloooooowly developing a curriculum for teaching music, with a focus on mandolin (did I mention slowly?). I don’t know that I’d want to become a full-time teacher, but I would at least like to continue developing this curriculum until it’s complete, so I at least have something more concrete to offer my current/future students than “ok, what do you want to learn today?” To the best of my knowledge I have the necessary tools, so I guess the biggest thing that I need to work on is motivation.

    JD

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  7. Hi. I’m a writer at a marketing agency. I came here 7 years ago after being a feature writer/section editor at a newspaper for 12 years. It’s a decent job with a nice work environment (most of the time) and offers some degree of freedom and flexibility, but as long as I’m chained to a place that I have to go into every day for a given number of hours with only a couple of weeks’ vacation per year, I feel like a prisoner, no matter how great the job might be. On top of that, I’m dealing with burnout. I write the same kinds of articles for the same types of publications month after month, year after year. Each time a new publication rolls around that I have to write for, I struggle with the sense that I just…can’t…do…this…AGAIN. I have many different things I enjoy doing on the side, some of which have been somewhat lucrative. I don’t know if any of them could be built up to provide a full-time income, and I’m afraid I’d become bored with doing any one of them if I had to do it all day, every day, though it still might be better than what I’m doing now. I’ve long dreamed of cobbling several of these little streams of income together to create a flexible, interesting portfolio career. But my time and energy are limited, and I don’t want to take any time away from my husband and son to do what I feel would need to be done to build these pursuits into something that would one day allow me to leave my job. So I’m stuck. Really, really stuck.

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    • Margaret,

      Reading your comment and others, was a bit scary in a good way. Scary, because I am about to graduate college and interested in a similar path that has been mentioned by many of us. Good, because it awesome to understand what how you gal and guys are dealing with the problem or how your feeling. In a way, its like seeing future versions of myself, whats the solution? I feel like most INFPs are talented individuals but we also have a few baggage like boredom, limited setting and or the likes. I have been think quite a bit lately about myself and other INFPs, have you ever thought about applying your skills to be an entrepreneur or starting your own small business? Or do freelance work? Example:web content/web design, writer (book?) , etc. From observation, it seems INFPs who do like their jobs do not like the lack of work/life balance. So, why not stay in current job till you decide on a new plan and take the leap (make sure you have some $$ cushioning)? Take the chance, be your own boss, if not, find a business partner who complements your strength and weakness. Keep us updated on what you decided to do or not, and why. Thanks

      Reply

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